Tutorials · Uncategorized

What To Do With Your Fabric Scraps

Today I thought I’d write a post that even non-sewers couldimg_3219 probably benefit from; what to do with any scrap bits of fabric that you have around, whether they’re from a dressmaking or quilting project, or just a top that you don’t wear anymore. I’m meant to be writing an essay for English Lit at the moment, but I thought this would be FAR more enjoyable to do (the book I’m writing about is a bit weird and I don’t have the foggiest what the question is asking me to do). So,  let’s get on with it:

Self-covering Buttons

Amount of fabric needed: probably around 5cm per button

Hollie Sews on YouTube recently did a video tutorial on how to make these buttons, which I think are super cute and would look great either as an embellishment on a skirt, or as buttons for a blouse. They require hardly any fabric, so would be a great use for those bits that are really small but not quite small enough to throw away.  This could either be done in a contrast fabric or the fabric to match the garment.

 

Hemline Nylon Self Cover Buttons 11 mm:

Self- covered buttons as a hairclip:

Another way you could use self-covered buttons is by supergluing them, or sewing them if you have the time, onto a hairclip – you could even match it to whatever you’re wearing that day if you’re using a scrap of that fabric! I’ve made a lot of crochet flowers in my time and not really been sure what to do with them, but they’re really good to attach to hairclips as well, and they would make a cute present!

 

Contrasting Pockets

Using a fabric that contrasts the rest of the garment is a really cool way to make a skirt or dress extra snazzy. On both of the Hollyburn skirts that I’ve made (if you want to read about the bobbin one pictured above, I’ll link my post here) I’ve done this, and you could definitely get two pockets out of a fat-quarter size of fabric, and might even have a bit left over. This would look especially good with a garment that’s a block colour and then to have a really busy pocket fabric, or vice versa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, you could also do contrasting patch pockets, which would definitely require less fabric than these full ones.

Contrasting  cuffs ot collars 

This one speaks for itself really, but here are a few pictures for inspiration (not taken by me, but when you see the photos that will probably be obvious)

Image result for contrasting  collarLove this collar: {green and white polka dot dress}:

of course, which fabric you use for the collar is up to you – the two photos on the lefy show a plain white fabric, while the ones on the right (while they have other shirts over them and are actually collars from the shirt underneath but you get the picture) are slightly livelier fabrics. Just remember that if it’s a directional print to cut the collar piece out upside down! As shown in the picture on the far left, the same fabric could be used as the contrast collar, or you could just do contrasting cuffs, or just a contrast collar – it all depends on your pattern, how you want it to look and how much leftover fabric you have.

Stuffing

The last one that I’ll talk about is for all those teeny weeny tiny bits that are a bit useless for anything else. Simply throw these bits in a box or a jar (preferably a pretty one) so that you can use them to stuff any sewn, knitted or crocheted delight that needs it, so that you don’t have to shell out on that special polyfibre stuffing which is quite pricey.

Of course there are LOADS more things that you can do with fabric scraps, and if you’d like me to I can most definitely make another post, just let me know either in the blog comments or comment/ message me on instagram, @hobblinghandmades. These were just a few brief ideas of things that I’ve done already or plan to do in the future – hope you enjoyed!

(Originally posted – 29/11/2016)

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